Some Lines from Rumi’s Poetry

Jalāl ad-Dīn Muhammad Balkhī also known as Jalāl ad-Dīn Muhammad Rūmī (30 September 1207 – 17 December 1273) was a Persian poet, jurist, theologian, and Sufi mystic.

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Gone, inner and outer,
no moon, no ground or sky.

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Dance, when you’re broken open.
Dance, if you’ve torn the bandage off.
Dance in the middle of the fighting.
Dance in your blood.
Dance, when you’re perfectly free.

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Let the lover be disgraceful, crazy,
absentminded. Someone sober
will worry about things going badly.
Let the lover be.

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Let yourself be silently drawn
by the stronger pull of what you really love.

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Pale sunlight,
pale the wall.
Love moves away.
The light changes.
I need more grace
than I thought.

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Come to the orchid in Spring.
There is light and wine, and sweethearts
in the pomegranate flowers.
If you do not come, these do not matter.
If you do come, these do not matter.

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Thirst drove me down to the water
where I drank the moon’s reflection.

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Be melting snow.
Wash yourself of yourself.

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A night full of talking that hurts,
my worst held-back secrets.
Everything has to do with loving and not loving.
This night will pass.
Then we have work to do.

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Do you pay regular visits to yourself?
Don’t argue or answer rationally.
Let us die,
and dying, reply.

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Most people guard against going into the fire,
and so end up in it.

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To praise is to praise
how one surrenders
to the emptiness.

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We rarely hear the inner music,
but we’re all dancing to it nevertheless.

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When the ocean surges,
don’t let me just hear it.
Let it splash inside my chest!

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